Time and the illusionary idea we are in deficit

Let’s be honest, how many people complain about not having adequate time. So many wake up in a frenzied state, wondering, how the hell am I going to get all theses tasks done today?

Chronological time is man made, we all know this, yet we become its slave. Yep, all too often time dictates our ever steps and shapes our reality. In truth, people are so governed by the time that it’s become a status symbol. Meaning, when you are a time slave, ‘ you are important!’ Important to whom? Surely not your loved ones who barely see you are getting any quality time with you!

“Quality time”

What am I saying when I apply this common colloquial, that implies a certain kindness and love.

Often our attempt to provide ” quality time” involves sitting or even go out for dinner with someone and we are not being presented. We all have done this, the person loves to speak and we just keep spinning the wheel, however, we are miles away. We might look on the outside to be there, but inside we are having a time obsession, tick tock, tick ticking away. Our brain is wondering how we will manage things tomorrow better. It’s dying to get better we tell ourselves and we will get that much needed rest! Is this true, will this type of life ever give us rest? Some will say once I am retired! Others will say once the children grow up! What ever the future idolised perceptions are they are all nonsensical because the only time you truly can guarantee is the present moment and today! Yes, this moment when you’re still breathing is your only true opportunities to change the time obsession.

Below Buddha wisdom, source ATI

‘If he breathes in a long breath, he should comprehend this with full awareness. If he breathes out a long breath, he should comprehend this with full awareness. If he breathes in a short breath, he should comprehend this with full awareness. if he breathes out a short breath, he should comprehend this with full awareness.

“He breathes in experiencing the whole body, he breathes out experiencing the whole body”: that is, with well-placed mindfulness, he sees the beginning, the middle and the end of the two phases, the in-breath and the out-breath. As he practices watching the in-breath and the out breath with mindfulness, he calms down and tranquilizes the two functions of in breathing and out-breathing.

The Buddha illustrates this with a simile. When a clever turner or his apprentice works an object on his lathe, he attends to his task with fixed attention: in making a long turn or a short turn, he knows that he is making a long turn or a short turn. In the same manner if the practitioner of meditation breathes in a long breath he comprehends it as such; and if he breathes out a long breath, he comprehends it as such; if he breathes in a short breath, he comprehends it as such; and if he breathes out a short breath, he comprehends it as such. He exercises his awareness so as to see the beginning, the middle and the end of these two functions of breathing in and breathing out. He comprehends with wisdom the calming down of these two aspects of in-breathing and out-breathing.

In this way he comprehends the two functions of in-breathing and out-breathing in himself, and the two functions of in breathing and out-breathing in other persons. He also comprehends the two functions of in-breathing and out-breathing in himself and in others in rapid alternation. He comprehends as well the cause for the arising of in-breathing and out-breathing, and the cause for the cessation of in breathing and out-breathing, and the moment-by-moment arising and cessation of in-breathing and out-breathing.

He then realizes that this body which exercises the two functions of in-breathing and out-breathing is only a body, not an ego or “I.” This mindfulness and wisdom become helpful in developing greater and more profound mindfulness and wisdom, enabling him to discard the erroneous conceptions of things in terms of “I” and “mine.” He then becomes skilled in living with wisdom in respect of this body and he does not grasp anything in the world with craving, conceit or false views. Living unattached, the meditator treads the path to Nibbana by contemplating the nature of the body.’

We need to apply our wisdom and open ourselves to the truth. The truth is we all need to slow down and value what important and use our time wisely. Imagine getting into the bush for a month with no watch, electronic devices and only being guided by the rising and setting of the sun. Our stomachs would guide us for meals and nature would prove valuable lessons in enjoying the moment. Sound nice, and something we can work towards together. We can start simple.

  • Spend less
  • Want less
  • Need less
  • Eat less
  • Desire less
  • Ask for less

Leading a simple life is not about being broke and owning nothing. It about having some satisfied where your at and having realistic ideas about what is achievable, without throwing our whole rhythm of life out the window. We can find balance and time can slow down if we slow down. Simple exercises, just stop and sit under a tree for thirty minutes a day, no looking at phones or talking, just sitting. Often just a quiet stroll in a park, alone also can balance us. We all need to be more mindful of this modern day monster called time management, so many books and ideas. Simply slow down, breath and relevant your perceptions.

My time is mine not someone else’s, it’s my life and it’s not for sale! Culture norms have no interest to me, I beat to my own rhythm and my rhythm is peace, joy and gratitude…

🙏👊

I thoroughly enjoy writing and find it relaxing. I live in Ocean Grove, Victoria, Australia.

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